Blog Post #6: The light at the end of the tunnel

I think the three class skills the I feel most confident in are interviewing, video gathering, and video editing. I have always been a very curious person so asking questions has always been second nature to me. My topic throughout this course was veterans which can be a very emotional subject for some people. From the start, I always tried to be as sensitive and respectful as I possibly could be during interviews. It was because of this approach that after interviewing the President of Honor Flight, she invited me to an event and asked multiple veterans who had gone on the most recent flight to speak to me for my story. After using the same approach while interviewing them, every veteran that I interviewed thanked me afterward for being so respectful. When it comes to video gathering and editing, my confidence comes from the fact that I have been working with video in professional newsrooms for the past three years of my life. At a previous tv station that I worked at, I served as a multimedia journalist which meant that I was solely responsible for shooting, producing, and editing my own stories. I believe that this came across in my selection of b-roll in my TV-style and short video. The b-roll that I chose complemented the story that my interview subjects and I were telling. In the short video, I interviewed the director of the Museum of Missouri Military History Charles Machon. As he described the different exhibits and objects on display, I matched up video of those exact things. For example, when Charles talked about the full-size helicopter they have on display, I cut to a sequence of shots of the helicopter. Likewise, with my TV-Style piece, I was able to get b-roll for the story that matched with the story. I think that it is because of how comfortable I am working with video that I was able to so effectively use video to enhance the stories that I told.

As confident as I am in my interviewing and video skills, I think there are also some areas that I can improve upon. Chief among them would be my writing skills, photo editing, and audio editing. It was these three things that gave me the most trouble throughout the course mostly because I have not had as much experience in these areas. One of the hardest things was writing tight and trimming my stories down to fit within the time parameters for each project. I think that the only way that I am going to become a better writer is by continuing to practice more and doing more stories and seeing my professors for more help. In terms of photo and audio editing, the best thing that I can do is to practice as well. I could check equipment out from the Journalism School on my free time and use things in my everyday life such as my friends to become more proficient. Whether it is taking photos of them or recording audio at events that I attend. I have gotten significantly better with all three of these during this course and have built a solid foundation with them. Going forward, it will just be a matter of building on that foundation to become more comfortable with all the different mediums. And I believe that the more comfortable I am, the better journalist I will be.

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TV Style: Missouri Veterans History Project

The Missouri Veterans History Project is an all-volunteer organization that aims to record and document as many veteran’s stories as possible. Three copies are made of each interview. One is given to the veteran, one is sent to the Missouri Historical Society and the other is sent to the Library of Congress where it is added to a searchable online database. I spoke with two people involved with the project, Kirk Klingler and Jeff Corrigin to learn more about it.

WORD: Tv-Style Video

Total Run Time: 1:59

 

SCRIPT:

(TAKE PCKG)

PERREAULT:

WHEN YOU THINK OF THE ISLE CAPRI CASINO AND HOTEL, YOU LIKELY THINK OF THE FISH OUT FRONT, OR THE GAMBLING MACHINES INSIDE. BUT THAT’S JUST THE SURFACE. (0:07.43)

EVERY OTHER FRIDAY, THE CASINO ALLOWS SYSTEM ANALYST KIRK KLINGLER TO USE SOME OF IT’S SPACE TO INTERVIEW VETERANS FOR THE MISSOURI VETERANS HISTORY PROJECT, AN ALL VOLUNTEER PROJECT THAT RECORDS AND DOCUMENTS VETERANS STORIES. (0:11.32)

KIRK:

“It’s an opportunity for veterans to tell their story of their service to our country in their own words.” (0:05.21)

PERREAULT:

A NAVY VETERAN, KLINGLER TOLD HIS STORY FOR THE PROJECT IN 2016. LIKE MANY, HE WAS NERVOUS TO TELL HIS STORY BUT HIS WIFE CONVINCED HIM TO.

KIRK:

“My wife confronted me and said the children and the grandchildren will want to know what you’ve done so when the opportunity came about, I took advantage of it because I would like my kids to know what service I performed for this country.” (0:15.26)

PERREAULT:

AS SITE COORDINATOR, KLINGLER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR SETTING UP AND BOOKING ALL VETERANS INTERVIEWS IN THE BOONVILLE AREA. HE SAYS THAT THE INTERVIEWS OFTEN GET EMOTIONAL. HE RECALLS ONE WITH A VIETNAM VET.

KIRK:

“He went in and refueled an aircraft that was over Vietnam. He was given explicit orders not to but he went ahead and did it because he knew the man might not make it back to the ship and this person whose life he saved by defying the orders he was given calls him every Christmas day to thank him for saving his life.”

PERREAULT:

AFTER THE INTERVIEWS ARE FILMED, THEY ARE SENT TO THE HISTORICAL ORATOR FOR THE MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY JEFF CORRIGIN. CORRIGIN PROCESSES THEM AND MAKES COPIES OF EACH INTERVIEW.

JEFF:

“We are documenting more Missouri veteran’s stories, keeping them for our states history, our nation’s history and it’s fascinating. I think that a small ground of volunteers since October 2010 when the group started has been able to interview 1285 veterans.” (0:15.28)

PERREAULT:

KLINGLER NOW HAS HIS SIGHT SET ON INTERVIEWINGING MISSOURI’S GOVERNOR ERIC GREITENS, WHO SERVED AS A NAVY SEAL IN THE 2000’S.

DANIEL PERREAULT, KOMU 8 NEWS, COLUMBIA.

(END PCKG)

Museum of Missouri Military History

Nestled on the Missouri National Guard training grounds in Jefferson City, the Museum of Missouri Military History pays tribute to the citizens of the state Missouri who have served in the armed forces. With over 64,000 square feet of space, the Museum house multiple authentic military vehicles, pieces of artillery and artifacts. Museum director Charles Machnon hopes that those who visit the museum develop a better appreciation for those who have served and the sacrifices made for our country. Machon said he feels a duty to tell their story.

WORD: Daniel Perreault_Short Video

Total Run Time: 1:00

 

 

Blog Post #4: Is a source biased?

For this blog, I chose to discuss a New York Times article entitled “Trump Picks Christopher Wray to Be F.B.I. Director” by Glenn Thrush and Julie Hirschfeld Davis, published on June 7, 2017. Aside from a tweet from President Trump and a statement from the White House, the only other source that was used in this article was Alice Fisher, a former Assistant Attorney General. It seems to me that the point of putting Fisher in the article was to support his qualifications for the position. I think a source like that is necessary, I do not, however, think she is the best choice. In the story, Thrush and Davis write that she took over the position of chief of the criminal division of the Justice Department after Wray. The reporters would have been better off finding someone who worked alongside Wray at the Justice Department. It does not necessarily matter who it is, so long as they worked alongside him, they will come across as more credible vouching for Wray’s character than Fisher does.
While hard to get, Chris Christie would have been a great person to talk to about Chris Wray. The two have known each other since they both worked at the Justice Department and Wray recently represent Christie in hearings regarding New Jersey’s infamous “bridge-gate” incident. Given their long history, I think that Christie would give very commentary reviews about Wray. I would have also liked to see some type of reaction to the announcement from workers at the FBI or Justice Department since they are most affected by it. I feel like someone from either of those departments would give an honest assessment of Wray and if they feel that he is the right fit to lead the FBI.

New York Times Article

Central Missouri Honor Flight

Intro: On a Sunday afternoon, 75 veterans and their families are gathered in a conference room. These veterans are members of Central Missouri Honor Flights 46th Flight. A little over two weeks after their flight, they gathered to reflect on their journey. And, as Daniel Perreault (PER-OH) from member station K-B-I-A reports, it’s the little things that mean the most to our nations veterans.

(TAKE PCKG)

FADE UP CLAPPING.wav

PERREAULT: When Honor Flight Vice President Steve Paulsell announced a large donation to Central Missouri Honor Flight, every veteran in the room stood and applauded. They knew exactly where that money is going.

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FADE IN AUDIENCE.wav

Honor Flight is a national organization that fly’s veterans to see the memorials in Washington DC for the day free of charge. For some veterans, the memorials are understandably emotional. But for others, it’s the warm receptions from ordinary people that gets to them. For Michael Keith, it was a moment after landing in Washington.

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“This little girl was about four years old, maybe younger. Felt her tugging on my brises a little. I look down and, a little bitty tiny girl. And she says ‘Thank you for keeping me safe mister and then she just run over and hugged her mom. And there was a marine beside me, it brought tears to both of our eyes. I guarantee you it did.”

PERREAULT: From hundreds waving flags when they came off the airplane to the little things throughout the day. Russell Bell is also a Vietnam veteran who was on the flight.

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“The entire trip was just one emotional episode after the other. And what amazed me is that everywhere we went, when we got off their bus, there would be some dignitary like a representative or an officer from one of the Military branches there to greet us. It was just pretty amazing.”

PERREAULT: The experience is also emotional for the guardians who are responsible for the individual veterans. It hits especially close to home for Steve Hahn, who himself is a veteran.

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“I’ve walked in their footsteps and understand what they’re going through. Even, it’s a healing process for them but then it’s an also a healing process for me and some of the stuff that I’ve seen ah…to talk with somebody else whose been in my footsteps and for them to be vice versa.”

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PERREAULT: And as Flight 46 nears it’s close, Steve and the other Honor Flight volunteers are already looking forward to the next flight scheduled for Early July. For the 100 veterans on flight 47, their Honor Flight journey is just beginning.

For NPR News, I’m Daniel Perreault in Columbia, Missouri.

(OUT CUE)

RESUBMIT:

Blog Post Number 3

HOST:

MU Sophomore Braden Kobeski is living his life on the fly.

BRADEN:

“THERE’S NOT LIKE ONE CLEAR PATH THAT I’M TRYING TO TAKE BUT YEAH I GUESS JUST FIGURING THINGS OUT, DIPPING MY FEET INTO THE WATER.”

HOST:

When Kobeski came to MU in August 2016, he wanted to have an open attitude towards everything that MU had to offer. He joined a wide variety of clubs and organizations including KOMU, KBIA, and MUTV 23. The exposure to a variety of different things has shifted his interest within the field of journalism. And he is even prepared if a career in journalism does not work out.

BRADEN:

“I THOUGHT I WANTED TO DO BROADCAST/TV RADIO AND I STILL DO TO SOME EXTENT. MAYBE NOT NEWS THOUGH, I DON’T KNOW WHY. I DON’T WANT TO DO NEWS AS MUCH BECAUSE IT’S A LITTLE BIT OF A DOWNER BUT NOW I’M CHANGING INTO DOC J WHICH IS DOCUMENTARY JOURNALISM, MORE VIDEOGRAPHY STUFF. IF THAT DOESN’T PAN OUT..UH…I COULD ALWAYS BE AN ACTOR.”

 

SOT #1: https://soundcloud.com/user-528473319/blog-3-sot-1

SOT #2: https://soundcloud.com/user-528473319/blog-3-sot-2

 

 

Columbia Honors Veterans and Active Duty Service Members on Memorial Day

Little Kart Dude
A Moolah Shriner takes part in the 29th annual Salute to Veterans Parade on Monday, May 29, 2017 in Columbia, Missouri. On their website, the Shriners describe themselves as an “organization of brothers working for the greater good.”
JERRY PROFILE Photo
Vietnam veteran Jerry Kilgore watches the 29th annual Salute to Veterans Parade on Monday, May 29, 2017, in Columbia, Missouri. Kilgore has attended ever single Memorial Day parade in Columbia since it began in 1988.
AMERICAN FLAG CHUTE
A member of the United States Army Black Daggers parachutes in to Marvin Owens Field at Columbia College with the American flag on Monday, May 29, 2017 in Columbia, Missouri. The Black Daggers parachuted in while the Columbia Community Band performed the national anthem during the annual Salute to the Nation ceremony.
Tuskegee Airman
Original members of the Tuskegee Airmen rides on a trailer during the 29th annual Salute to Veterans Parade on Monday, May 29, 2017, in Columbia, Missouri. They were featured guests at the Salute to the Nation ceremony that followed the parade.
Wreath
A wreath sits in front of the Boone County Courthouse Veterans’ Memorial in Columbia, Missouri on Monday, May 29, 2017. More than 28 different organizations laid wreaths at the memorial in commemoration of Memorial Day.
Bow on Wreath
A bow is tied to the top of a wreath in front of the Boone County Courthouse Veterans’ Memorial in Columbia Missouri on Monday, May 29, 2017.

 

 

The City of Columbia, Missouri held its annual Salute to Veterans Parade and Salute to the Nation ceremony on Monday, May 29, 2017. The events capped off a Memorial Day weekend full of tributes that included a two-day air show at the Columbia Regional Airport. The parade featured high school marching bands, veterans in cars, and a variety of resources from the Columbia Fire Department, Columbia Police Department, and Boone County Sherriff’s Office. Hundreds of people, from families in search of a fun activity to veterans like Jerry Kilgore lined to parade route. Kilgore said that Memorial Day is always tough for him because it brings back a lot of memories. The parade and celebrations help him get through it.

The real highlight of the weekend came during the Salute to the Nation ceremony when members of US and Canadian special forces parachuted in. The Canadian Armed Forces Sky Hawks and US Army Black Daggers tumbled through the air as they performed unforgettable aerial stunts.

At the end of the day, the point of having all of these events to commemorate Memorial Day is to stress the importance of the real meaning of the holiday. Organizers want to ensure that future generations understand the sacrifice that members of US military and their families make. As Korean War veteran Howard William Osterkamp once said, “all gave some; some gave all.” Veterans like Jerry Kilgore want to make sure that these ideas and the true meaning of Memorial Day live on years many years to come.

Blog Post #2: What’s in a source?

For this blog, I chose to discuss a New York Times article entitled “Alabama Inmate, 75, Hopes to Dodge Death for an Eighth Time” by reporter Alan Blinder, published on May 24, 2017. Given how controversial a topic capital punishment is, it is important to have people on both sides of the issue. Blinder does a nice job balances out voices in the story while also identifying stakeholders within the story. The biggest of which is Tommy Arthur, the 75-year-old man at the center of the Article. Blinder spoke with Arthur from prison. Being able to interview Arthur allows the reporter to put a human face on this story and creates an emotional tug for the readers. This allows readers to relate to and feel for Arthur which in turn makes it a more compelling story. While was undoubtedly knowledgeable about his own case, Blinder also spoke with his lawyer Suhana Han to get an update on exactly where the case stands. I think Blinder chose to have Han talk about the specifics of the legal situation because it comes across as more credible from a lawyer. Blinder also included some quotes from Robert Dunham, Executive Director of the Death Penalty Information Center to develop a background on the case and establish why it is so controversial. I find Dunham very reliable in large part because I would expect someone in his position to be neutral and that is exactly how his quotes came across. As chief deputy attorney general, Clay Crenshaw represents the voice in favor of capital punishment. I find his perspective reliable because he used to be in charge of the capital litigation division. Blinder found his sources by identifying people who had a stake in the outcome of the execution.

LINK TO ARTICLE

Real Humans of Columbia

James Photo Edited 1
James Allen sits on the corner of Broadway and Ninth Street in Columbia, Missouri, on Thursday, May 18, 2017, and asks people passing by for money. Allen has been homeless since he moved to Columbia from Tampa, Florida, four years ago. He said he came to mid-Missouri, because he “wanted to see a part of the country he hadn’t seen before.” Allen also said the summertime is a difficult time of year for homeless people in downtown Columbia, because there are less students around to help them.

 

Marlee Photo
Marlee Baldridge walks through Peace Park in Columbia, Missouri, on Friday, May 19, 2017.  Her mood is electric, as she beams with pride over her job as a comic editor at Fan Girl. A self-described geek, Baldridge is living out her childhood dreams drawing comics and commenting on the comic world. She is a big fan of the Southern Bastards comic series, in large part because of racism she experienced in her hometown. She came to MU and to Columbia to escape that racism while at the same time follow in the footsteps of family members who have gone to school or worked at MU. Since coming to MU, she has developed a new perspective on her experiences growing up. She said she has learned to view it as a “good history lesson for myself.”
Luis Final Edit
Luis Cruz strolls around downtown Columbia, Missouri, on Thursday, May 18, 2017, less than 24 hours before his High School graduation. Cruz will graduate on Friday, May 19, 2017 from Hickman High School in Columbia. Originally from Northern Mexico, Cruz came to the United States in hopes of getting a better education. Adjustment to life in Columbia was not easy for Cruz. Since his English is not very good, he says the language barrier has made things very difficult for him. He has however, found success on the soccer field and recently even earned himself a scholarship to play soccer in college.